Monthly Archives: August 2010

100 Things I Have Learned About Photography: A Personal Take

I came across this post by Eric Kim, an urban photographer from L.A., recounting 100 things that he’s learned about photography. As I have not made such a list, I thought I’d repost his here and add my personal opinions about each one. This way, you get a good, and hopefully improved, list, and I get to share some of what I’VE learned so far in my career. Note: I am not trying to put down Eric’s list in any way — I’m just sharing my personal views and expanding on his ideas where I can. I commend him for taking the time to put this list out there; please look at his original post here. He also appears to be an excellent photographer. Eric’s list is in bold. My comments are italicized. Hope you enjoy. 1. Just because someone has an expensive camera doesn’t mean that they’re a good photographer. 100% correct. An expensive camera can aid you in taking better photos, but only if you know how to use it. Buying a $2000+ camera and leaving it on auto is like buying a race car and never racing it. You can also take some pretty sweet shots with cell phone cameras — the best camera is the one that’s with you. As long as you know how to use it. 2. Always shoot in RAW. Always. Mostly true. While shooting RAW (a non-compressed, full information file format) gives you much greater control in post processing, I wouldn’t exactly shoot in it at the office Christmas party. The files just take up too much space for it to be worthwhile in some situations. 3. Prime lenses help you learn to be a better photographer. I can’t really comment on this, as I only own one prime lens (one that doesn’t zoom). Some people swear by them, as they force you to really consider YOUR position (your feet are the zoom), and you have to be more careful in where you are relative to the subject. Zooms are more versatile, so I’ve stuck to them thus far. However, prime lenses do tend to be sharper, from what the lens-critics tell me. I also think it’s better to learn on film (like I did!) for a similar reason — you have to think more about what you’re doing than with digital. However, digital has many benefits, as do zoom lenses. It all comes down to preference and your knowledge of your equipment. Here’s a good (and new) post about the switch from zooms to primes. (OK, so I guess I can comment on this after all.) 4. Photo editing is an art in itself. Absolutely.

A Coleopteric Surprise: Eastern Hercules Beetle

Last night, we came across this delightful fellow outside on the deck. It’s currently quite hot in Arkansas (upper 90s F every day, sometimes over 100 F), and  therefore the bugs are abound. He was quite still, and modeled well — and with only one light to see him, that …

Thesis Completion, or, I Step Into the World

‘Tis done. I’ve finalized my honors thesis, after integrating my committee’s comments, and will turn it in this week. It’s the culmination of four years of study, and because of it, I’ll graduate with honors. I did most of the work in Costa Rica, and then did more when …

Wedding: Helen & Lindi

Last weekend Darby and I drove to Talequah, OK, to shoot our friends Lindi and Helen’s wedding. We met Helen in our freshman year, and Lindi shortly thereafter. They finally got hitched last weekend, and it was a great time. Yes, it’s true, and I’ll just say it–they’re lesbians, and, …

Let the Mobile Uploads Begin

So, it finally happened. I finally got an iPhone (4). I’ve seen some quite impressive mobile photos, and I’m going to take a stab at it. The best camera is the one you have with you, right?

I’m still learning how to use it, but I’ve uploaded a few to …